Baila ConmiGA performing at the Sottile Theater...we erred on the side of VERY simple. 

Baila ConmiGA performing at the Sottile Theater...we erred on the side of VERY simple. 

      I recently performed at and attended a weekend dance event and was impressed with the performances— the teams and performers had selected wonderful music, were performing interesting and well-executed choreography, and had all obviously put in a lot of energy and effort into their performances. What was less impressive— or perhaps too impressive— was the costume selection.

    One team’s outfits looked like Willy Wonka and Kermit the Frog had decided to collaborate on a fashion line, and I saw many male performers rocking what looked like bedazzled Star Trek uniforms. I couldn’t appreciate the performances as much because I was wondering a) how much their costumes cost and b) what purpose the costumes served. 

    When the costume becomes the main focus of a performance, the dancers, and the artistry, are lost. When a costume doesn’t match the performance, it leaves the audience wondering what they just saw. The effect of the performance is lessened because all of the pieces— the music, the movement style, the choreography, and the costuming— aren’t working together as a whole. 

    One of my favorite Latin dance pieces of all time, Ataca and Alemana’s “Te Extrano,” is so perfect because their costumes are so simple and so appropriate for the theme and style of the piece. Jeans and white tops— the outfits complement the dancers, the music, and the routine. You can focus on the choreography and the connection between the dancers— you’re not distracted by wondering if her lady bits are going to fall out or if it’s hard for him to pee in a neon unitard. You also don’t feel any confusion— you completely understand why they chose those outfits. I’m certain that the simplicity and congruency of the costumes are a big part of why that video has 88 million views. 

    I saw a great quote— “Clothes make a statement. Costumes tell a story.”

    What story are lycra, feathers, rhinestones, and sequins telling? I’m all for it if it makes sense to the piece, but many of these costumes seem stuck in the 80s. It’s time to forge a new aesthetic for 2016— other dance styles have evolved with the times.  Ballerinas no longer wear just tutus and tiaras— they wear Under Armour and blue jeans. Latin dance and music are rapidly evolving— the costumes just need to catch up.

    What do you think? Are you a performer? Do you select your own costumes? What is your thought process when selecting costumes? Do you enjoy seeing men in rhinestone v-neck unitards and don’t want that to go away? Comment below!

        

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